Articles

nafta

20 Jul No Corporate Trade Deal!

The NAFTA objectives from President Donald Trump are a failure because they won’t protect jobs or raise wages. If the new North American Free Trade Agreement follows this lead, the deal will be just like the corporate-written ones Trump campaigned against during the election. The objectives would even allow Mexico and Canada to continue to bypass “Buy American” rules. Working people will fight for a good deal...

Read More
good-jobs

18 Jul Our Priority is Good Jobs

Working people again have stopped Republican leaders from gutting health care to give more tax cuts to the rich and powerful. While remaining steadfast on health care, we also are looking to the next big policy fights. One will be over the federal budget. We will mobilize to defeat any proposal that hurts working families. Message of the Day—Our Priority Is Good Jobs The budget priorities of working people are simple. We want: Massive investments in America’s infrastructure, including mass transit, to create jobs, increase competitiveness and bring more workers into apprenticeship programs for a lifetime in the skilled trades. Long-term investment in public education, from pre-K through graduate schools, which includes basic research for the next generation of innovation. Expand Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid to make sure more people have access to quality, affordable health care and a secure retirement. Kitchen Table Economics 38,000: That’s how many workers in Missouri have been cheated out of a raise by the Republican majority in the state legislature, which lowered the minimum wage in St. Louis from $10 an hour to $7.70 WTF (We Think It’s Funny) “Curses!” shouts fist-shaking Meals on Wheels ringleader as President Trump cuts off gravy train. Take Action Wall Street should pay its fair share!        ...

Read More

27 Jun Working families say: Solve America’s problems, don’t make more

The Senate Republican health care bill may use a little less gasoline than the House version, but it still sets fire to the health insurance of 22 million Americans, which is why it will go down in history as one of America’s worst pieces of legislation. Working families are united against it. Message of the Day—Working Families Say: Solve America’s Problems, Don’t Make More! The Senate health care scam would rip health insurance from 22 million working people. It takes Medicaid coverage from 15 million people—children with disabilities who need care at school, pregnant women and seniors receiving nursing home care or support to stay in the community. The bill gives about $1 trillion to corporations and the wealthiest 1% while imposing a tax on employer-sponsored health insurance and increasing out-of-pocket costs and taxes on working people. The Senate bill hurts everyone. If your insurance isn’t gone, you will have fewer protections and your premiums will climb as providers pass along their uncompensated care costs. Polls over the past few days say the Senate “wealthcare” bill has lowered President Donald Trump’s already dismal approval rating to 38% and pushed his disapproval rating up to 57%.   Kitchen Table Economics 6 months: If you don’t have insurance when you get sick or suffer an accident, that’s how long you’d have to wait for lifesaving health care—even if it kills you.   Take Action Stop Republican “wealthcare”!   Source: Labor Wire...

Read More
201-706-22-wtf

22 Jun Secret ‘wealthcare’ bill is out, and it’s bad

June 22, 2017 Like the worst jack-in-the-box ever, the Senate health care bill popped out of a secretive Senate working group today. If it becomes law, it would throw millions off health insurance by cutting Medicaid deeply to give massive tax breaks to corporations and the wealthiest 1%. Now that we have the actual bill, working people will mount a massive effort to kill it. Message of the Day—Secret ‘Wealthcare’ Bill Is Out, Bad! Reckless Republican leaders in the Senate have produced this bill in unprecedented secrecy, hiding the fact that it would, for instance, throw patients out of nursing homes to give tax breaks to billionaires. This irresponsible bill will be incredibly unpopular. The House version is one of the least-liked pieces of legislation in history—only 8% thought it should become law. The Senate version is just as bad. The impact of this bill would be devastating. The health care of millions of Americans—from military veterans to young children, from the elderly to working families—hangs in the balance. Democratic and Republican legislators should come together to improve and expand health care—ending the tax on quality health plans, expanding Medicaid and lowering prescription drug costs. Kitchen Table Economics Two of every three: That’s the portion of Americans in nursing homes who are served by Medicaid, from which the Senate health bill would cut billions to give tax breaks to the wealthy. Take Action Protect America’s health! ...

Read More
topic-elderly-population

19 Jun Expand Medicaid! It works!

June 19, 2017 The American Health Care Act, which Republican leaders want to pass in the next two weeks, would kick seniors out of nursing homes to give tax breaks to corporate CEOs and the wealthiest 1%. A new video from the AFL-CIO lays out the facts about why each of us should call 888-865-8089 to tell our senators to vote NO on the AHCA. Message of the Day—Expand Medicaid! It Works! Medicaid saves seniors. Medicaid is one of the single best programs to help seniors afford nursing home care. Medicaid helps people stay at home longer. Medicaid helps seniors and people with significant disabilities stay at home by offering programs to bring health care directly to them. Medicaid protects children. Medicaid pays for nearly half of all childbirths in the United States and guarantees more than 30 million children access to medical care. People with special needs rely on Medicaid. Nearly 5 million children with special care needs, such as Down syndrome, cerebral palsy and autism, are covered by Medicaid and other public insurance. Kitchen Table Economics $80,000: That’s the typical cost of a year of nursing home care in a semiprivate room. WTF (We Think It’s Funny) Take Action Protect America’s health! ...

Read More
foto-32

28 Mar Mike Garcia: A Legacy of Organizing

Posted in Blog: Labor Edge Mike Garcia: A Legacy of Organizing March 28, 2017 Fearless. That was Mike Garcia. In his nearly 40 years with the labor movement, Mike never backed down from a fight. He was fierce, passionate and unwaveringly committed to social and economic justice, especially for low-wage workers most in need of a voice on the job. Mike passed away over the weekend after an illness. Today, the entire California labor movement mourns his loss with his family, friends and brothers and sisters at SEIU-USWW. Mike’s career in labor began in 1980, organizing janitors in multiple cities. To Mike, organizing wasn’t a job; it was a calling. Immigrant janitors are among the workers most in danger of exploitation. Giving those workers a voice was the driving force of his career. As the leader of SEIU local 1877, Mike led success organizing campaigns for janitors at tech behemoths like Oracle and Apple.  In 2000, Mike led a three-week strike of janitors in Los Angeles, a bold action that led to dramatic gains for those workers and was the impetus for a powerful movement of low-wage workers in LA that continues to this day. Mike didn’t organize from behind a desk. He organized in the streets.  At the worksite.  At the homes of his members. It was a 24-hour, 365-day job. That’s what his members loved about him. He wasn’t just their leader. He was their friend. He was one of them. His fierce commitment to worker justice led to the expansion of Local 1877, and in 2010, Mike became the leader of a new 40,000-member strong statewide union representing property service workers, SEIU-USWW. Mike was also a powerful voice for all workers through his role on the Labor Federation’s executive council. Mike would challenge us to be bolder, to take risks and to never forget that at the core, we’re all organizers. His leadership helped unions lead the fight to defeat Meg Whitman in 2010, electing Jerry Brown as Governor. While there were many things to admire about Mike – his tenacity, his drive, his strategic mind, his compassion – his legacy is grounded in his ability to get his members to believe that anything is possible when they stand together to take on powerful forces aligned against them. Under Mike’s leadership, a union of immigrants rose to become one of the strongest voices for worker rights and social justice in the state of California. Those members believed in Mike, and Mike got them to believe in themselves, no matter the odds. Mike was a friend. He was a brother. And he was one hell of an organizer. While we mourn his passing, we know his spirit lives on in the hearts of every immigrant and worker who organized for justice. It lives on with every family lifted out of poverty because they got a union on the job. It lives on through the social justice movements Mike helped build, that gave voice to the voiceless and power to the exploited and vulnerable. We’ll miss you dearly, Mike. There will never be another like you. — In lieu of flowers, Mike’s wishes were for contributions to be made to the “Building Skills Partnership” C/O Mike Garcia Scholarship Fund 828 West Washington Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90015 in order to help SEIU members’ children attend college.  (Tax deductible )  For more info, please email info@buildingskills.org Information on services for Mike Garcia: TBA Posted in Blog: Labor Edge ...

Read More

12 Nov Immigrants gripped by deportation fears with Trump election

Immigrants gripped by deportation fears with Trump election By ASTRID GALVAN and AMY TAXIN, Associated Press THE ASSOCIATED PRESS STATEMENT OF NEWS VALUES AND PRINCIPLES PHOENIX (AP) — President-elect Donald Trump launched his candidacy on an anti-immigrant sentiment and has vowed to repeal a key Obama administration program that shields hundreds of thousands of people from deportation. Now, many immigrants in the country illegally, or with relatives who are, fear deportation and separation from their families. In immigrant-heavy areas like Los Angeles and Phoenix, activists are scrambling to provide informational meetings for immigrants to help them protect themselves from deportation. Others want legal immigrants to apply for citizenship so they can eventually obtain legal status for relatives. "The more we can naturalize people and stabilize our families and root our communities the better," said Julio Perez, executive director of California's Orange County Labor Federation, which is sponsoring naturalization events in response to the election. Here are stories from some immigrants who fear what a Trump presidency could bring. WORKING NOW BUT FEARING DEPORTATION Thirty-two-year-old Karina Ruiz is one of 741,000 immigrants benefiting from the program launched by President Barack Obama called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. It allows young adults to get work permits, social security numbers and protects them from deportation. The Phoenix mother of three says deferred action allowed her to work and graduate with a biochemistry degree from Arizona State University in 2015. She hopes to be a pharmacist one day. But Trump has promised to end DACA, and Ruiz fears she could be sent to Mexico and separated from her U.S.-born children. "I'm not giving up DACA so easily, not going down without a fight," Ruiz said. WORRIED PARENTS WILL BE SENT TO MEXICO Michael Nazario, a 27-year-old community activist from Phoenix, is shielded by DACA and married to an American citizen, which should allow him to get permanent residency soon. He came to the U.S. with his parents illegally when he was three and didn't find out about his legal status until he tried to enlist in the Marine Corps and could not do so without a social security card. All four of Nazario's siblings were born in the U.S. and his parents would probably have been eligible to stay under an expansion of Obama's DACA program called Deferred Action for Parents of Americans. But the program was challenged in court and never went into effect. Trump also opposes it. Nazario said a grassroots effort to make sure the program stays in place is now necessary to ensure his parents can stay in Phoenix. "I feel bothered by this election but it only inspires me to just keep going forward because what's at stake is not only my deferred action but my family as well, my father, my mother and the 11 million immigrants all across the country," Nazario said. ASPIRING LAWYER FEARS DEPORTATION TO SOUTH KOREA Matt Lee's parents brought him on a tourist visa to Southern California from South Korea when he was 13. Now 25, he has a college biology degree and wants to attend law school so he can become a patent lawyer. He was among the first to apply for the DACA program and now works legally, helping other South Koreans fill out immigration forms. But his dreams of becoming a lawyer are clouded by Trump's vow to get rid of DACA. Other young immigrants have told him they fear they will be tracked down for deportation because the federal government has their names and addresses, courtesy of their DACA applications. One mother said she is pulling her daughter out of a study abroad program in China to get the daughter back into the U.S. before Trump takes office, Lee said. "People are not sure if Trump will definitely carry out what he said because it is a crazy idea," he said. "Now the crazy idea of him being elected — that happened. Nothing is certain." NO GREEN CARD WITHOUT A RETURN TO MEXICO Dora Rodriguez has lived in the U.S. illegally for 27 years but has still managed to raise her two U.S.-born children and work at a money transfer business in Santa Ana, California. More than 75 percent of the city's residents are Latino, and nearly half of them were born abroad. Rodriguez said her daughter is now an adult, and could sponsor Rodriguez for permanent residency. But Rodriguez, in her 40s, would have to return to Mexico to apply and risk staying there for years to get her papers, leaving behind her teenage son in the U.S. She remembers anti-immigration sentiment in the 1990s in California but that didn't get her deported. She said she doubted much would end up changing under a Trump presidency. "When (former California Governor) Pete Wilson was here, I heard the same ...

Read More